2012-09-22

Super Foul Egg 1.4 Rejected

Another rejection! This time the reviewer changed the left and right directions to the same key via the prefs menu and rejected the game because the left and right directions are mapped to the same key.

Really, Apple? Really?

EDIT: Apple reviewer makes idiot developer eat own words when the developer finds obvious bug. Resubmitting it now. Will it get rejected because two directions can be assigned to the same key? Or will it get rejected because it doesn’t remove the borked prefs file saved by the last version?

2012-08-27

Apple Vs Samsung

Apple describe iOS as having an “Elegant and intuitive interface” that “You know how to use…from the first time you pick it up.”

It’s intuitive because it’s obvious. Tap/pinch to zoom, rotate gesture, drag to scroll: all obvious gestures. Non-obvious gestures (place phone on the ground and do a handstand to zoom) didn’t make the cut.

Now answer this: if the gestures are successful because they are obvious to a lay user from the first time he picks it up, how can they be patented if the main criteria for these patents is that they are non-obvious to a professional user interface designer?

2012-08-21

Super Foul Egg In The App Store

Super Foul Egg is now available from the Mac App Store!

This version includes the final menu screen, allowing players to choose the number of egg colours in a game, the drop speed, the starting number of garbage egg rows, and best of 3, 5 and 7 games. It also includes a “Controls” menu item that opens a window that shows the keyboard controls and a new icon.

It’s free, so give it a try!

The current version has one known bug. The text in the menu screens doesn’t render properly on retina Macs; it’s a known problem with Cocos2d’s TTF support. I’ve fixed this in the BitBucket repository by switching to a BMFont instead of TrueType, so I hope to get a new version up soon.

Now that’s out of the way I can write the usual grumble about the process of getting software into the App Store. My iMac refused to codesign the binary so I couldn’t release it on that machine. It kept insisting that there weren’t enough teams (or some similarly meaningless error). It was right - my provisioning profiles in the Xcode Organiser had “Unknown” listed as their team. Trying to refresh via the Organiser didn’t work. I eventually discovered that the way to fix the problem was to delete absolutely everything from the “login” keychain and refresh in the organiser, but not before I’d spent two hours fighting with the damned thing and switched to my MacBook instead.

On the MacBook, I discovered that I had too many teams. My last employer didn’t get around to revoking my access to their iOS developer team. I removed myself, but it seems that removing access doesn’t remove me from the team. I apparently have to contact Apple to do that, which I assume is because Apple love their developers so much they want to interact with them whenever possible. It’s not that they hate their developers and can’t be bothered to make a UI for that function.

In total, giving Apple $99 for the developer licence probably took about 10 minutes. Getting codesigning to work took about 3 hours. The approval process took exactly 2 weeks. Going from “ready for sale” status to appearing in app store searches took 6 hours.

2012-05-10

iOS Provisioning

The code signing and provisioning aspect of iOS development is, without a doubt, the worst thing that Apple has ever produced. I’ve been reminded of this because I just updated to OSX 10.7.4 and for some reason all of my provisioning profiles now complain that they can’t find a valid signing identity. An hour or so of googling and button clicking later and I’m admitting defeat for the moment.

As an example of how hateful the process is and how little regard Apple has for its community of developers, here’s a screenshot from their certificate history page:

Yes, those are dates. And yes, they are sorted alphabetically. This from a company that is universally praised for its attention to detail and the ease of use of its products.

Developers! Apple hates you.