2017-05-24

Fake DS Lite

I had some problems with devKitARM recently that broke Chuckie Egg and Hanky Alien. Thinking that the problem might be related to some DSi-specific code that got added to libnds, I decided to try out the games on my DS Lite. Unfortunately, the console no longer recognized DS carts. No amount of fiddling would get it to read either of the two carts I tested.

Nuts.

I’d heard that AliExpress - purveyor of fine knock-off Chinese electronics like the GB Boy Colour - had a selection of fake DS Lites on offer, so I went digging. I eventually settled on a cobalt blue DS Lite for the very reasonable price of $40. Given that an original Nintendo console would have cost more than double that back in the day, and given that it’s difficult to find an original, new DS Lite for less than ten times that, it seemed like a chance worth taking.

Here’s what arrived:

Fake DS Lite

Let’s start with the bad first. Side by side with a real DS, the shell is obviously not original. The top case is slightly larger than it should be and bulges outwards slightly along the edge where the clamshell opens. The square black rubber pads that are dotted around the upper screen are fitted imprecisely. The plastic feels cheap, especially when compared to the beautifully glossy Nintendo device. The A, B, X and Y buttons are horribly mushy, and the Start and Select buttons are too small for the holes that they sit in. The cover over the top screen is fitted incorrectly, allowing light from the screen to bleed through its top edge. The screens themselves are set deeper into the casing than on the original. The DS cartridge slot makes a series of nasty griding sounds when a cartridge is inserted, and the cover over the GBA slot is looser than on the original handheld.

In short, the casing is cheap and poorly assembled. But it’s close enough.

Now the good. My original DS Lite came from the factory with a dead pixel; a common problem. Cracked hinges were another, and the hinges on mine cracked not long after I bought it. The clone device doesn’t exhibit either problem (yet). Both screens are perfect and indistinguishable from the original. We’ll see how long the hinge lasts.

Functionally it appears identical to the Nintendo console. When you consider that the K1-GBA still isn’t a perfect clone of the GBA, and that this thing has a GBA embedded within it, that’s stunning. The only explanations that make any sense are that this clone is from a DS factory secretly making extra devices on the side, or that someone stole and replicated the PCBs like the Everdrive clones, or that it’s assembled from spare OEM parts and a third-party case.

It even comes with a box (missing the serial number, of course), manual, soft case and screen protectors.

I haven’t really tried the stylus yet. It’s possible that the touchscreen is terrible. The screen’s texture feels different to the original, though that could just be because it’s new. I haven’t tried the charger yet as the battery is fully charged. The combination of a knock-off charger and a knock-off battery is a little concerning. Other than that, it looks to be a good alternative to either buying a second-hand DS Lite (and possibly ending up with a device that was mistreated) or paying a crazy amount for a new official device.

Oh, and now that I have a second DS Lite, my original console has started recognizing carts again.

2016-07-24

AGB-101

I need to stop collecting these.

AGB-101

The purple and black GBAs came from eBay, while the yellow version (it looks orange in the photo, but it’s really banana yellow) is from Retro Modding. Like GB modders Deadpan Robot (formerly Gameboy Mods), Retro Modding take used GBAs and refurbish them with a variety of third-party shells and enhancements.

I was very pleased with Retro Modding. In addition to providing great service and doing an excellent job of modifying the GBA - for considerably less than the current prices on eBay - they threw in a neat case and a bunch of stickers.

Aspiring backlit GBA owners should note that a triwing screwdriver may turn out to be an essential purchase. Two of these three handhelds have required adjustments to the voltage potentiometer inside the console in order to fix graphical glitches on the screen. The purple unit displayed flickering colors, whilst the yellow unit was noticably interlaced. There’s a video here that demonstrates where to insert a screwdriver if you don’t mind poking a hole in the sticker on the back of the device, but a triwing screwdriver will allow you to open it up and avoid the hole.

The approach that’s worked best for me is to make small adjustments of around a quarter-turn, testing out the console with each change. It’s a little laborious, as each test requires reassembling the console enough to be able to re-insert the cartridge and batteries, but I’ve seen numerous (unsubstantiated) reports that turning it too far can damage the screen. The purple unit was particularly troublesome to get right because it would work well for a day or so before the flickering re-appeared.